Category Archives: Hummingbird Plant

Three Honeysuckles

We have three regular honeysuckles in the yard and one evergreen honeysuckle. I will post pictures of the evergreen honeysuckle separately.

The purple-leaf honeysuckle is on the front of the house, and it bloomed in early June. The variegated honeysuckle and the late Dutch honeysuckle are both on the swing. The variegated honeysuckle bloomed in May, and the late Dutch honeysuckle is blooming right now (it has been blooming since June).

purple-leaf honeysuckle: Lonicera japonica ‘Purpurea’:

purple-leaf honeysuckle - Lonicera japonica 'Purpurea' purple-leaf honeysuckle - Lonicera japonica 'Purpurea' purple-leaf honeysuckle - Lonicera japonica 'Purpurea' purple-leaf honeysuckle - Lonicera japonica 'Purpurea'

variegated honeysuckle: Lonicera periclymenum ‘Harlequin’:

variegated honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Harlequin'variegated honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Harlequin' variegated honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Harlequin' variegated honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Harlequin'

late Dutch honeysuckle: Lonicera periclymenum ‘Serotina’:

late Dutch honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Serotina' late Dutch honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Serotina' late Dutch honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Serotina'late Dutch honeysuckle - Lonicera periclymenum 'Serotina'

 

Pink Princess Escallonias

We have four Pink Princess escallonias (Escallonia x exoniensis ‘Fradesii’) in the backyard. They are evergreen and are situated to block the area under the deck (the yard is on a slope). They have a light scent and are quite pretty. Probably by next year the escallonias will need some pruning.

I took these pictures two days ago.

Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii'

Weigelas

We have five weigelas in the yard. I think we mostly became interested in the plants upon learning that hummingbirds visit them, but also some weigelas have great variegated foliage. The last few years I have forgotten to prune the weigelas at the appropriate time, and I really need to do it this year (some are getting rather large). CIscoe Morris talks about pruning weigelas in his book. These photographs are from mid-May to late May, but actually some of the weigelas are still blooming.

Weigela florida ‘Red Prince’:

Weigela florida 'Red Prince' Weigela florida 'Red Prince' Weigela florida 'Red Prince' Weigela florida 'Red Prince'

Weigela florida ‘Eyecatcher’:

Weigela florida 'Eyecatcher' Weigela florida 'Eyecatcher' Weigela florida 'Eyecatcher' Weigela florida 'Eyecatcher'

My Monet weigela–Weigela florida ‘Verweig’:

My Monet weigela--Weigela florida 'Verweig' My Monet weigela--Weigela florida 'Verweig'

Wine and Roses weigela–Weigela florida ‘Alexandra’:

Wine and Roses weigela--Weigela florida 'Alexandra' Wine and Roses weigela--Weigela florida 'Alexandra' Wine and Roses weigela--Weigela florida 'Alexandra'

French Lace weigela–Weigela florida ‘Brigela’ (note the hummingbird in the last four photos):

French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' with hummingbird French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' with hummingbird French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' with hummingbird French Lace weigela--Weigela florida 'Brigela' with hummingbird

Red Flowering Currants

We have two red flowering currants: one is a cultivar, and the other is the regular native species. The cultivar definitely blooms more profusely (and earlier). The cultivar is in the woodland garden, which has pretty nice soil, while the regular species is in the swamp: that could make a different, I guess. These pictures were mostly taken in March, with a few taken in early April.

Ribes sanguineum ‘King Edward VII’:

flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII'

Ribes sanguineum:

red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum

Crocosmias – Summer 2013

There were plants that bloomed in the late summer and in the fall that did not get posted here (I got busy). I’ve decided to skip them and instead focus on 2014 plants. However, I already had a draft of this crocosmia post, so I feel like I might as well post it. Just know that these plants are not blooming right now.

Hmm, maybe this year I can get a photograph of a hummingbird visiting the crocosmias–the hummingbirds definitely love them.

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

neighbors' crocosmias showed up

neighbors’ crocosmias showed up

Crocosmia 'Carmine Brilliant'

Crocosmia ‘Carmine Brilliant’

Crocosmia 'Carmine Brilliant'

Crocosmia ‘Carmine Brilliant’

Crocosmia 'Carmine Brilliant'

Crocosmia ‘Carmine Brilliant’

Crocosmia 'Emily McKenzie'

Crocosmia ‘Emily McKenzie’

Crocosmia 'Emily McKenzie'

Crocosmia ‘Emily McKenzie’

Monardas (Bee Balms)

The monardas are located in the backyard, beneath the apricot tree. They are in partial shade, but do not seem to mind. They are good hummingbird plants. Monardas are sometimes prone to powdery mildew, but these seem free of it thus far.

Monarda didyma 'Aquarius'

Monarda didyma ‘Aquarius’

Monarda didyma 'Petite Wonder'

Monarda didyma ‘Petite Wonder’

Monarda didyma 'Petite Delight'

Monarda didyma ‘Petite Delight’

 Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline' 2

Monarda didyma ‘Jacob Cline’ 1

Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline' 1

Monarda didyma ‘Jacob Cline’ 2

Monarda 'Fireball' 1

Monarda ‘Fireball’ 1

Monarda 'Fireball' 2

Monarda ‘Fireball’ 2

Monarda 'Pink Lace'

Monarda ‘Pink Lace’

Scarlet Monkeyflower

I picked up the scarlet monkeyflower (Mimulus cardinalis) at the garden show in 2012. It was one of the items in those unreliable Ziploc bags (I talked about the Ziploc bags in previous garden show posts), but as opposed to many plants, it did well.

Mimulus cardinalis is a native plant, and attracts hummingbirds. I put it in the swamp, and since the swamp is along a pathway, I don’t spend much time there – just pass through. So I think the hummingbirds sometimes use it and I don’t see. The co-gardener has seen hummingbirds feeding from the scarlet monkeyflower, and I think I saw it last year. I expected the plant to be red and it turned out to be quite orange, but that is ok. Right now the swamp is not especially colorful, so a pop of orange is not a bad thing (although the co-gardener is a little iffy about orange).

2013 Miscell 2085 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2084 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2124 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2123 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2122 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2121 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis

You can kind of see that I am having a problem with the tall straight juncuses – they are flopping over on everything. I may prune them, but I am still warming up to the idea (I’m a bit nervous).

I would like to have more native flowers in the garden… but one has to see them for sale (preferably not in the Ziploc bags – too iffy), and one has to have space.

Speaking of the Ziploc bags, I think the foxtail lily died. Also the European anemone. Those bagged perennials are just not reliable. I planted that foxtail lily (and the anemone for that matter) in the ground right away, and it was purchased from a reputable seller – but regardless, the foliage is yellow and looks quite dead. I’m going to say no to the Ziploc bags at next year’s garden show (in February).

Iochroma ‘Royal Queen’

Iochroma ‘Royal Queen’ was purchased at the garden show in February. It is not completely hardy in our area, so it was planted in a pot that can be moved around if especially cold weather is expected. Sometime in perhaps March the iochroma became quite windblown and lost all of its blossoms and some of its leaves. Since then it has improved quite nicely. The plant was marked as “hummingbird candy,” but I am not sure if the hummingbirds use it.

2013 Miscell 2353 Iochroma 'Royal Queen' 2013 Miscell 2203 Iochroma 'Royal Queen' with lobelia 2013 Miscell 2099 Iochroma 'Royal Queen' with lobelia 2013 Miscell 1778 Iochroma 'Royal Queen'