Category Archives: Native

Ninebarks

We have two ninebarks in the yard: a showy dark-colored plant and also the native ninebark. They are both growing quite quickly. The pictures of the plants blooming are from late May to early June.

Diabolo ninebark: Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Monlo’:

Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo'

Pacific ninebark: Physocarpus capitatus (native):

Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus

Nootka Rose

This is the first year that the native Nootka rose (Rosa nutkana) did much blooming (we planted it two years ago). Yes, it has a lovely rose scent. These pictures are from mid-May.

Nootka rose - Rosa nutkana Nootka rose - Rosa nutkana Nootka rose - Rosa nutkana Nootka rose - Rosa nutkana Nootka rose - Rosa nutkana Nootka rose - Rosa nutkana

Variegated Flowering Dogwoods

We have two dogwood trees that are cultivars of the native dogwood (they are Cornus nuttallii ‘Goldspot’). We planted them against the side of the house two years ago to replace some vine maples that died. Um, I don’t think they are especially healthy (dogwoods sometimes get a disease), and they don’t become covered in blossoms in spring they way some non-native dogwoods do. They are all right, I guess. The yellow corkscrew willow is really pressing over into their area–it is perhaps a bit too robust (I’ll post pictures of it later).

These pictures were taken in late April.

western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot' western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot' western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot' western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot'

Hmm, the foliage doesn’t look especially variegated in these pictures. It is, though, although maybe less so than before (I’d have to go out and inspect them to know).

Oregon Grapes

We have two Oregon grapes (Mahonia aquifolium) in the yellow/cat garden. I am not entirely sure which cultivar they are: they came with two tags (each), one of which said ‘Compacta’ and the other said ‘John Muir’. They are staying really small, anyhow. Yes, I wanted compact plants, but I am not sure if they have grown at all, and we’ve had them two years. Oh well, plenty of other things are already growing way too big. These pictures were taken mid-March.

Oregon Grapes - Mahonia aquifolium 'Compacta' Oregon Grapes - Mahonia aquifolium 'Compacta'

Red Flowering Currants

We have two red flowering currants: one is a cultivar, and the other is the regular native species. The cultivar definitely blooms more profusely (and earlier). The cultivar is in the woodland garden, which has pretty nice soil, while the regular species is in the swamp: that could make a different, I guess. These pictures were mostly taken in March, with a few taken in early April.

Ribes sanguineum ‘King Edward VII’:

flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII'

Ribes sanguineum:

red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum

Scarlet Monkeyflower

I picked up the scarlet monkeyflower (Mimulus cardinalis) at the garden show in 2012. It was one of the items in those unreliable Ziploc bags (I talked about the Ziploc bags in previous garden show posts), but as opposed to many plants, it did well.

Mimulus cardinalis is a native plant, and attracts hummingbirds. I put it in the swamp, and since the swamp is along a pathway, I don’t spend much time there – just pass through. So I think the hummingbirds sometimes use it and I don’t see. The co-gardener has seen hummingbirds feeding from the scarlet monkeyflower, and I think I saw it last year. I expected the plant to be red and it turned out to be quite orange, but that is ok. Right now the swamp is not especially colorful, so a pop of orange is not a bad thing (although the co-gardener is a little iffy about orange).

2013 Miscell 2085 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2084 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2124 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2123 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2122 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis 2013 Miscell 2121 scarlet monkey flower - Mimulus cardinalis

You can kind of see that I am having a problem with the tall straight juncuses – they are flopping over on everything. I may prune them, but I am still warming up to the idea (I’m a bit nervous).

I would like to have more native flowers in the garden… but one has to see them for sale (preferably not in the Ziploc bags – too iffy), and one has to have space.

Speaking of the Ziploc bags, I think the foxtail lily died. Also the European anemone. Those bagged perennials are just not reliable. I planted that foxtail lily (and the anemone for that matter) in the ground right away, and it was purchased from a reputable seller – but regardless, the foliage is yellow and looks quite dead. I’m going to say no to the Ziploc bags at next year’s garden show (in February).

‘Blue Bird’ Delphinium, Native Bleeding Heart, Heuchera ‘Lime Marmalade,’ Hardy Gloxinia

As I think I mentioned before, some of the delphiniums from last year didn’t come back, and some of the new delphiniums are yet to bloom. The co-gardener pretty much said “not again.” I don’t know why they are so testy… maybe they just don’t like being in the rose garden (unfortunately, thanks to the neighbor’s trees, the rose garden is part shade – not good for roses). ‘Blue Bird’ looks nice, though.

Delphinium 'Blue Bird'

Delphinium ‘Blue Bird’

Delphinium 'Blue Bird'

Delphinium ‘Blue Bird’

This is done blooming, but I had meant to include it. I already posted some pictures of the volunteer native bleeding hearts, but this one is in the woodland garden and was planted there.

Pacific bleeding heart - Dicentra formosa

Pacific bleeding heart – Dicentra formosa

This heuchera is in the woodland garden (the other two from the woodland garden got moved out in a previous post). It seems to be doing fine there. Heucheras were originally referred to as “coral bells,” but a lot of them are no longer grown for their blooms, but instead for their evergreen foliage.

Heuchera 'Lime Marmalade'

Heuchera ‘Lime Marmalade’

The hardy gloxinia might be done – I’m not sure. It is seriously crowded in its spot and did not attain the height that it did last year (it was purchased blooming, which can lead to let-downs the next year).

hardy gloxinia: Incarvillea delavay 'Bees Pink'

hardy gloxinia: Incarvillea delavay ‘Bees Pink’

Oriental Poppy, Big Root Geraniums, Saxifragas, Camas

I am behind on some of these mixed perennials posts….

The oriental poppy has really grown since last year

oriental poppy: Papaver orientale 'Princess Victoria Louise'

oriental poppy: Papaver orientale ‘Princess Victoria Louise’

oriental poppy: Papaver orientale 'Princess Victoria Louise'

oriental poppy: Papaver orientale ‘Princess Victoria Louise’

There are two variegated big root geraniums

bigroot geranium: Geranium macrorrhizum 'Variegatum'

big root geranium: Geranium macrorrhizum ‘Variegatum’

bigroot geranium: Geranium macrorrhizum 'Variegatum'

big root geranium: Geranium macrorrhizum ‘Variegatum’

I’ve included the two saxifragas before, but I don’t think while they were blooming. I like the frothy look.

Saxifraga x urbium 'Aurea-punctata'

Saxifraga x urbium ‘Aurea-punctata’

Saxifraga x urbium 'Aurea-punctata'

Saxifraga x urbium ‘Aurea-punctata’

The camas bloomed this year, which really surprised me. I got it at last year’s garden show in one of those Ziploc bags. Camas is a native wildflower.

common camas: Camassia quamash

common camas: Camassia quamash

common camas: Camassia quamash

common camas: Camassia quamash

Planted May

This does not cover everything planted in May, because earlier plants are in this post. Possibly I am forgetting something, but we are solidly into June now so it is time I post this. I talked about most of the plants in other posts (purchase posts), so I will just include photographs here.

hypoestes

hypoestes

Juncus effusus 'Curly Wurly'

Juncus effusus ‘Curly Wurly’

Juncus effusus 'Curly Wurly'

Juncus effusus ‘Curly Wurly’

Juncus inflexus 'Blue Mohawk'

Juncus inflexus ‘Blue Mohawk’

Juncus inflexus 'Blue Mohawk'

Juncus inflexus ‘Blue Mohawk’

Juncus inflexus 'Blue Mohawk'

Juncus inflexus ‘Blue Mohawk’

Bergenia 'Magic Giant': elephant's ears or pigsqueak

Bergenia ‘Magic Giant’: elephant’s ears or pigsqueak

Brunnera macrophylla 'Variegata'

Brunnera macrophylla ‘Variegata’

monkshood: Aconitum cammarum 'Stainless Steel'

monkshood: Aconitum cammarum ‘Stainless Steel’

purple lobelia: Lobelia x gerardii

purple lobelia: Lobelia x gerardii

Lobelia x speciosa 'Compliment Deep Red'

Lobelia x speciosa ‘Compliment Deep Red’

Lobelia x speciosa 'Compliment Deep Red'

Lobelia x speciosa ‘Compliment Deep Red’

California fuchsia: Zauschneria californica

California fuchsia: Zauschneria californica

Lavender 'Betty's Blue'

Lavender ‘Betty’s Blue’

variegated lacecap hydrangea: Hydrangea macrophylla 'Mariesii Variegata'

variegated lacecap hydrangea: Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Mariesii Variegata’

leatherleaf fern: Polypodium scouleri

leatherleaf fern: Polypodium scouleri

wallflower: Erysimum linifolium 'Variegata'

wallflower: Erysimum linifolium ‘Variegata’

dwarf bottlebrush: Callistemon citrinus 'Little John'

dwarf bottlebrush: Callistemon citrinus ‘Little John’

dwarf bottlebrush: Callistemon citrinus 'Little John'

dwarf bottlebrush: Callistemon citrinus ‘Little John’

pineleaf penstemon: Penstemon pinifolius 'Nearly Red'

pineleaf penstemon: Penstemon pinifolius ‘Nearly Red’

Hebe pimeleoides 'Quicksilver'

Hebe pimeleoides ‘Quicksilver’

pussytoes: Antennaria dioica 'Rubra'

pussytoes: Antennaria dioica ‘Rubra’

Heuchera cylindrica (native)

Heuchera cylindrica (native)

Campanula 'Dickson's Gold': bellflower

Campanula ‘Dickson’s Gold’: bellflower

Salvia roemeriana 'Hot Trumpets'

Salvia roemeriana ‘Hot Trumpets’

Parahebe catarractae 'Delight'

Parahebe catarractae ‘Delight’

Parahebe olsenii

Parahebe olsenii

Phlox paniculata 'Peppermint Twist'

Phlox paniculata ‘Peppermint Twist’

sweet William: Dianthus barbatus 'Dwarf Double Mix'

sweet William: Dianthus barbatus ‘Dwarf Double Mix’

sweet William: Dianthus barbatus 'Dwarf Double Mix'

sweet William: Dianthus barbatus ‘Dwarf Double Mix’

African daisy: osteospermum

African daisy: osteospermum

Dianthus 'Passion'

Dianthus ‘Passion’

Dianthus 'Passion'

Dianthus ‘Passion’

Campanula glomerata 'Emerald' and columbine: Aquilegia vulgaris 'Winky Purple and White'

Campanula glomerata ‘Emerald’ and columbine: Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Winky Purple and White’

Campanula glomerata 'Emerald'

Campanula glomerata ‘Emerald’

Campanula glomerata 'Emerald'

Campanula glomerata ‘Emerald’

Dianthus 'Candy Floss'

Dianthus ‘Candy Floss’

catchfly: Silene dioica 'Clifford Moor'

catchfly: Silene dioica ‘Clifford Moor’

rock cress: Arabis caucasica 'Variegata'

rock cress: Arabis caucasica ‘Variegata’

English daisy: Bellis perennis 'Habanera White with Red Tips'

English daisy: Bellis perennis ‘Habanera White with Red Tips’

English daisy: Bellis perennis 'Habanera White with Red Tips'

English daisy: Bellis perennis ‘Habanera White with Red Tips’

creeping phlox: Phlox subulata 'Candy Stripe'

creeping phlox: Phlox subulata ‘Candy Stripe’

sea campion: Silene uniflora 'Druett's Variegated'

sea campion: Silene uniflora ‘Druett’s Variegated’

Blooming Red Twig Dogwoods, Blooming Variegated Viburnum

I have not entirely caught up with my posts… The need for new posts is so apt to arise!

Here are some pictures of blooming shrubs that are no longer blooming.

The native red twig dogwood (Cornus sericea) was included in the native post

native red twig dogwood: Cornus sericea

native red twig dogwood: Cornus sericea

The variegated red twig dogwood (Cornus alba ‘Elegantissima’) was in the non- shrub row post

variegated red twig: Cornus alba 'Elegantissima'

variegated red twig: Cornus alba ‘Elegantissima’

Finally, this variegated viburnum (Viburnum japonicum ‘Variegatum’) was in the shrub row post

Viburnum japonicum 'Variegatum'

Viburnum japonicum ‘Variegatum’

Viburnum japonicum 'Variegatum'

Viburnum japonicum ‘Variegatum’