Category Archives: Perennial

Hellebores

Hellebores are reliable late-winter bloomers.

For each plant, there are about a couple photos from February 13 and about a couple from March 6.

Helleborus x ballardiae ‘Pink Frost’:

Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost' Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost' 2014 Miscell 0234 Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost' Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost'

Helleborus ‘Onyx Odyssey’:

Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey' Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey' Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey' Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey'

Helleborus orientalis ‘Frilly Kitten’:

Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten' Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten' Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten' Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten'

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’:

Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain' Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain' Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain' Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain'

Helleborus ‘Peppermint Ice’:

Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice' Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice' Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice' Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice'

Helleborus argutifolius ‘Snow Fever’:

Helleborus argutifolius 'Snow Fever' Helleborus argutifolius 'Snow Fever' Helleborus argutifolius 'Snow Fever'

Helleborus ‘Cherry Blossom’:

Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom' Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom' Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom' Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom'

Helleborus orientalis ‘Elly’:

Helleborus orientalis 'Elly' Helleborus orientalis 'Elly' Helleborus orientalis 'Elly' Helleborus orientalis 'Elly'

Crocosmias – Summer 2013

There were plants that bloomed in the late summer and in the fall that did not get posted here (I got busy). I’ve decided to skip them and instead focus on 2014 plants. However, I already had a draft of this crocosmia post, so I feel like I might as well post it. Just know that these plants are not blooming right now.

Hmm, maybe this year I can get a photograph of a hummingbird visiting the crocosmias–the hummingbirds definitely love them.

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

neighbors' crocosmias showed up

neighbors’ crocosmias showed up

Crocosmia 'Carmine Brilliant'

Crocosmia ‘Carmine Brilliant’

Crocosmia 'Carmine Brilliant'

Crocosmia ‘Carmine Brilliant’

Crocosmia 'Carmine Brilliant'

Crocosmia ‘Carmine Brilliant’

Crocosmia 'Emily McKenzie'

Crocosmia ‘Emily McKenzie’

Crocosmia 'Emily McKenzie'

Crocosmia ‘Emily McKenzie’

Monardas (Bee Balms)

The monardas are located in the backyard, beneath the apricot tree. They are in partial shade, but do not seem to mind. They are good hummingbird plants. Monardas are sometimes prone to powdery mildew, but these seem free of it thus far.

Monarda didyma 'Aquarius'

Monarda didyma ‘Aquarius’

Monarda didyma 'Petite Wonder'

Monarda didyma ‘Petite Wonder’

Monarda didyma 'Petite Delight'

Monarda didyma ‘Petite Delight’

 Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline' 2

Monarda didyma ‘Jacob Cline’ 1

Monarda didyma 'Jacob Cline' 1

Monarda didyma ‘Jacob Cline’ 2

Monarda 'Fireball' 1

Monarda ‘Fireball’ 1

Monarda 'Fireball' 2

Monarda ‘Fireball’ 2

Monarda 'Pink Lace'

Monarda ‘Pink Lace’

July 2013 Purchases

We bought a few plants in July (not all of which have been planted). We have definitely slowed down – on the other hand, we’ve also been busy. Four came from the grocery store (yes a grocery store with plants!), and three came from the everything store.

I bought this blue agastache thinking that when it bloomed the blossoms would be the shape that the hummingbirds like… it is just starting to open, and I think it will be more like Agastache foeniculum ‘Golden Jubilee’ in this post.

Agastache 'Blue Fortune'

Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’

The co-gardener picked up this decorative oregano.

decorative oregano: Origanum  rotundifolium 'Kent Beauty'

decorative oregano: Origanum rotundifolium ‘Kent Beauty’

Blue plants can be tricky to find, and I think that is why I picked up this plant. It was just finishing blooming, so it is hard to tell from the photo what the blooms look like. Next year!

Arkansas blue star: Amsonia hubrichtii

Arkansas blue star: Amsonia hubrichtii

At first I thought that this balloon flower was a campanula (also typically blue). The balloon flower (with which I was not familiar) is compact, so I think it will be easier to fit it in somewhere.

balloon flower: Platycodon  grandiflorus 'Sentimental Blue'

balloon flower: Platycodon grandiflorus ‘Sentimental Blue’

We had two Indian feathers in the front yard. They got huge, leggy, and completely lay down on some other plants. We pruned them hard and it killed them. I said no more Indian feathers, too undisciplined… but I gave in. At the everything store, some of the plants are outside so that one passes them when going into the store to buy other things. I think this plant will have to have a lot of space, and then maybe be pruned down if it starts to get leggy. The tag claimed that this variety is more supportive than others.

Indian feather: Gaura lindheimeri 'Snow Fountain'

Indian feather: Gaura lindheimeri ‘Snow Fountain’

The co-gardener collects shasta daisies – see this post and this post – and I couldn’t resist these two shasta daisies when I saw them in the impulse buy area of the everything store.

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Real Glory'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Real Glory’

This shasta daisy was only $4!

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Real Dream'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Real Dream’

I liked how pokey this veronica is… and it was only $4. There is a pink veronica (speedwell) in this post.

Veronica 'Royal Candles': speedwell

Veronica spicata ‘Royal Candles’: speedwell

Yet another varietal shasta daisy

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Real Neat'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Real Neat’

We originally mail-ordered a ‘Double Scoop Orangeberry’ coneflower along with several other coneflowers, but had to cancel the order when the shipment had still not arrived in May when we were headed to Europe. This price was better than the mail-order, and the plant is bigger. All the same, it is exciting to get plants in the mail and some of the many types of coneflowers can be hard to find.

coneflower: Echinacea purpurea 'Double Scoop Orangeberry'

coneflower: Echinacea purpurea ‘Double Scoop Orangeberry’

Chinese Primrose, Wallflower, Alstroemeria

The Chinese primrose grows in the swamp and provides some nice color.

Chinese pagoda primrose: Primula vialii

Chinese pagoda primrose: Primula vialii

I showed this wallflower before, but I thought it looked full and attractive. Definitely long blooming. It has gotten a bit too big for its spot – I might see if I can tame it a bit.

wallflower: Erysimum linifolium 'Bowle's Mauve'

wallflower: Erysimum linifolium ‘Bowle’s Mauve’

I really like this alstroemeria. The stems are not long like the cut flowers that can be purchased in the floral department – it is a rather compact lovely thing. I wouldn’t mind having more alstroemerias (this one came from the hardware store last year).

Alstroemeria 'Creamy Dark Pink'

Alstroemeria ‘Creamy Dark Pink’

Alstroemeria 'Creamy Dark Pink'

Alstroemeria ‘Creamy Dark Pink’

Shasta Daisies

The co-gardener collects shasta daisies (Leucanthemum x superbum), so there are many in the garden. They are generally reliable, long-blooming, and robust.

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Freak'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Freak’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum hybrid 'Darling Daisy'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum hybrid ‘Darling Daisy’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Lacrosse'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Lacrosse’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Crazy Daisy' 2

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Crazy Daisy’ 1

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Crazy Daisy' 1

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Crazy Daisy’ 2

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Laspider'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Laspider’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Esther Read'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Esther Read’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'White Mountain'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘White Mountain’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Victorian Secret'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Victorian Secret’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Aglaia'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Aglaia’ 1

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Aglaia' 2

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Aglaia’ 2

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Sante'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Sante’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Schneehurken' 3

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Schneehurken’ 1

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Schneehurken' 2

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Schneehurken’ 2

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Schneehurken' 1

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Schneehurken’ 3

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Snow Lady'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Snow Lady’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Daisy May' same as 'Daisy Duke'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Daisy May’ same as ‘Daisy Duke’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Prieure'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Prieure’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Silver Princess'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Silver Princess’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum  'Marconi'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Marconi’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Ice Star'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Ice Star’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Real Glory'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Real Glory’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum 'Real Dream'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum ‘Real Dream’

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum 'Real Neat'

shasta daisy: Leucanthemum x superbum ‘Real Neat’

 

Tree Mallow, Veronica (Speedwell), Hollyhock

The tree mallow (Lavatera ‘Red Rum’) is next to the fountain.

tree mallow: Lavatera 'Red Rum'

tree mallow: Lavatera ‘Red Rum’

tree mallow: Lavatera 'Red Rum'

tree mallow: Lavatera ‘Red Rum’

This veronica (Veronica spicata ‘Heidekind’) looks very similar to a salvia.

Veronica spicata 'Heidekind': speedwell

Veronica spicata ‘Heidekind’: speedwell

Two hollyhocks were planted in the rose garden last year. This one, Alcea rosea annua ‘Spring Celebrities Crimson’, is blooming this year. The other one, a purple one, is not dead, but only consists of a few leaves a few inches off of the ground. Hollyhocks generally don’t do well in the Pacific Northwest – they get a rust (fungus). Last year when we bought the plants at the hardware store we were willing to treat them like annuals.

hollyhock: Alcea rosea annua 'Spring Celebrities Crimson'

hollyhock: Alcea rosea annua ‘Spring Celebrities Crimson’