Category Archives: Tree

Willows

We have three willows in the garden: one in the swamp and two in the cat garden area. The willow in the swamp is a black pussy willow, so I’m posting pictures of it from February that show its fuzz. I may add more recent photographs of that willow after I weed the area (but it is in February when it looks interesting). The pictures of the other two willows are from spring and summer.

I see some pruning in the future, especially for the two willows in the cat garden. Actually, I’m not super fond of the shape of the black pussy willow, so maybe sometimes I’ll prune it down too.

You can see other views of two of the willows in this recent post about the cat garden.

black pussy willow: Salix gracilistyla ‘Melanostachys’:

black pussy willow - Salix gracilistyla 'Melanostachys' black pussy willow - Salix gracilistyla 'Melanostachys' black pussy willow - Salix gracilistyla 'Melanostachys'

purple willow: Salix purpurea Nana’:

purple willow - Salix purpurea Nana' purple willow - Salix purpurea Nana' purple willow - Salix purpurea Nana'

golden curls corkscrew willow: Salix matsudana ‘Golden Curls’:

golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls' golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls' golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls' golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' and golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls' golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls' golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls' golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls'

purple willow: Salix purpurea ‘Nana’ and golden curls corkscrew willow: Salix matsudana ‘Golden Curls’:

purple willow - Salix purpurea 'Nana' and golden curls corkscrew willow - Salix matsudana 'Golden Curls'

Variegated Flowering Dogwoods

We have two dogwood trees that are cultivars of the native dogwood (they are Cornus nuttallii ‘Goldspot’). We planted them against the side of the house two years ago to replace some vine maples that died. Um, I don’t think they are especially healthy (dogwoods sometimes get a disease), and they don’t become covered in blossoms in spring they way some non-native dogwoods do. They are all right, I guess. The yellow corkscrew willow is really pressing over into their area–it is perhaps a bit too robust (I’ll post pictures of it later).

These pictures were taken in late April.

western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot' western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot' western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot' western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot'

Hmm, the foliage doesn’t look especially variegated in these pictures. It is, though, although maybe less so than before (I’d have to go out and inspect them to know).

The Front Yard

The co-gardener pointed out that I don’t post pictures of the yard, but instead of plants. Well, this is mostly because I don’t want to show the weeds…. but also because I wasn’t sure that I wanted neighbors’ cars, houses, etc. in the pictures, and by posting shots of the yard it becomes obvious that I live in a 1980s/90s housing development (not a charming craftsman home, not a cottage…)

However, the front yard looks so great right now (although yes there are weeds), that I decided to post some photos. I am also going to make posts of the component parts of the front yard, and I will link them here as I do so.

(I weed-whacked yesterday – so the lawn doesn’t look like a meadow)

Sooooo… without further ado… here’s the front yard! Please, ignore the neighbors.

2013 Miscell 2255 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2254 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2235 front yard June 30 - hardy fuchsia - Fuchsia magellanica macrostema 2013 Miscell 2234 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2226 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2225 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2224 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2223 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2222 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2221 front yard June 30 2013 Miscell 2161 front yard June 23

As you can see, I have not finished lifting bulbs… basically, I got busy. I still plan to do it! (I did do the yellow/cat garden, which took awhile). I even bought a new trowel for it.

A penstemon post with more front yard pictures

Agastache post with more views

Front yard salvias post

Two front yard cape fuchsias post

Front dianthuses

Hardy fuchsias post

The front yard garden phlox

Red hot poker, Jupiter’s beard, and checkermallow

Shrub Row Plants

I recently weeded the shrub row, so took some pictures of the plants. They are not very big yet – most were planted last year – and they are not blooming. Once they are in bloom, I will post pictures in separate entries. I figured that since they are not blooming, I might as well plop them all together here.

The shrub row was designed partially as habitat for the birds, and also to block out the neighbor’s ugly fence. It will be a few years before either of those aims are achieved, but the plants look great regardless.

The fragrant osmanthus (Osmanthus fragrans) did not bloom last year, but it supposed to have a wonderful fragrance (hence the name). I hope it blooms this year!

fragrant osmanthus: Osmanthus fragrans

fragrant osmanthus: Osmanthus fragrans

The indigofera (Indigofera amblyantha) doesn’t look like much at the moment, but has really sweet delicate blossoms later on. I took a picture of a few leaves to try to convey the delicateness of the plant, but I am not sure that it worked. EDIT: since I took this picture it has leafed-out some.

Indigofera amblyantha

Indigofera amblyantha

Indigofera amblyantha

Indigofera amblyantha

This Eleutherococcus sieboldianus ‘Variegatus’ is a funny little plant without a common name. Yes, I see people using “five-leaf aralia,” but I am not sure about that, since it is only in the aralia family and not an aralia. It was bought for the variegated foliage.

Eleutherococcus sieboldianus 'Variegatus'

Eleutherococcus sieboldianus ‘Variegatus’

Eleutherococcus sieboldianus 'Variegatus'

Eleutherococcus sieboldianus ‘Variegatus’

Eleutherococcus sieboldianus 'Variegatus'

Eleutherococcus sieboldianus ‘Variegatus’

There is one nursery in the area that always underestimates eventual plant size on their signs and tags… the Chilean myrtles (Luma apiculata ‘Glanleam Gold’) are such a situation. There are two of them, and they are apparently going to get huge (although not very quickly, as I’m not sure that they have grown at all).

Chilean myrtle: Luma apiculata 'Glanleam Gold'

Chilean myrtle: Luma apiculata ‘Glanleam Gold’

Chilean myrtle: Luma apiculata 'Glanleam Gold'

Chilean myrtle: Luma apiculata ‘Glanleam Gold’

The variegated butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii ‘Monrell’) was a fun find, because variegated foliage is always appreciated. However, I’m a little scared to prune it down the way that many, including Ciscoe Morris, say to do, as I’m afraid that it will come up again unvariegated. As it is I’ve had to cut off unvariegated branches. So maybe it will get huge and woody instead.

Strawberry Lemonade butterfly bush: Buddleja davidii 'Monrell'

Strawberry Lemonade butterfly bush: Buddleja davidii ‘Monrell’

This locust tree (Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Lace Lady’) is right in front of the shrub row, and actually might get moved. I think right now the plant has more leaves than in these pictures. It is lacy and twisty – what more could one want? The locust might even get its own post sometime, once it is totally foliated (if it intends to do so).

Twisty Baby dwarf black locust: Robinia pseudoacacia 'Lace Lady'

Twisty Baby dwarf black locust: Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Lace Lady’

Twisty Baby dwarf black locust: Robinia pseudoacacia 'Lace Lady'

Twisty Baby dwarf black locust: Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Lace Lady’

I don’t think that the mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia ‘Raspberry Glow’) bloomed last year. It is evergreen… and I can’t give much more assessment because I haven’t seen it in action. Mountain laurels are related to rhododendrons.

mountain laurel: Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow'

mountain laurel: Kalmia latifolia ‘Raspberry Glow’

They call Calycanthus floridus “Carolina allspice” because it is native to the east coast. It is a scented plant, and the co-gardener and I saw it for sale at a nursery several counties away. I had read about it and knew that it was scented and had attractive dark red blooms, so we picked one out that had buds but was not quite blooming. Well, I went home and read in the trusty Sunset book that one should only buy the plants in bloom, because some smell better than others. It does not smell bad exactly, it is just a really unusual smell. I think it grew on me a little… witch hazels have a sort of odd fragrance, as well.

Carolina allspice: Calycanthus floridus

Carolina allspice: Calycanthus floridus

Last year I got a book from the library about scented plants, and got it in my mind that I needed a scented rhododendron and a scented hydrangea. So when we were at the big rhododendron nursery last year we picked out a white scented one, ‘Polar Bear.’ It did not bloom last year, and it looks like it will not bloom this year. That happens sometimes with certain types of rhododendrons – it can take years and years for them to bloom. On top of it, this plant is a weird shape (I think it flopped)… but it is putting on new growth so hopefully it will turn itself into something a little more, reasonable?

'Polar Bear' rhododendron

‘Polar Bear’ rhododendron

There are two pittosporums in the yard. This one, Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Marjorie Channon,’ is in the shrub row. It is variegated and supposedly has scented blooms, but I don’t really remember it blooming last year. The other pittosporum, which will show up in a later post, definitely has sweet-smelling white flowers which smell like orange blossoms (thus called a Japanese mock orange). This one gets pretty big, so we decided to stick it in the shrub row. It is evergreen.

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Marjorie Channon'

Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Marjorie Channon’

Ok the Wine and Roses (Weigela florida ‘Alexandra’). This was purchased bare-root (bare-root is always cheaper), and we didn’t realize how weird it would look when it foliated. All of the leaves are towards the top. I have since seen the same type of plant in nurseries, and I always comment “this one is not as weird looking as ours…” I think sometimes bare-root is a risky business, unless it is for something that is typically sold bare-root, like roses. The term “bare-root” means that the roots are loose, without being imbedded in a ball of soil, are typically kept in sawdust at the nursery, and the plants don’t have leaves yet. Once home, bare-root plants should be planted within a few days. Last year when we looked at this plant, I reminded the co-gardener that there had been interest in a variegated weigela, but the co-gardener figured that this one was so inexpensive that we could have both. Upon arriving home, the Wine and Roses weigela got a really great spot in the backyard. Once it turned out to look like it does, we lamented it for awhile until finally putting a much lovelier variegated weigela there instead, and moving this one to the shrub row. I think that we are going to cut it all the way down after it blooms, hoping that it will develop a more attractive shape. However, whenever we talk about not having space for something I remark “we could always get rid of the Wine and Roses.”

Wine and Roses weigela: Weigela florida 'Alexandra'

Wine and Roses weigela: Weigela florida ‘Alexandra’

I picked out this mock orange (Philadelphus ‘Snow White Fantasy’) after it had bloomed, so have not yet seen it doing its thing, but it should have nice white scented blooms.

mock orange: Philadelphus 'Snow White Fantasy'

mock orange: Philadelphus ‘Snow White Fantasy’

This evergreen viburnum (Viburnum japonicum ‘Variegatum’) is mostly for its eye-catching variegated foliage, but it should also bloom and have berries. As I recall, the blossoms were marketed as being scented, but the smell was slight. I could be confusing it with a different variegated viburnum (it will be in a future post).

Viburnum japonicum 'Variegatum'

Viburnum japonicum ‘Variegatum’

The co-gardener really wanted a doublefile viburnum, and we ended up with two last year. This one, Viburnum plicatum tomentosum ‘Summer Snowflake,’ is more upright than they typically are, and last year the blooms continued for months and months – much longer than the ‘Mariesii’ variety on the other side of the yard (which will be in a later post).

doublefile viburnum: Viburnum plicatum tomentosum 'Summer Snowflake'

doublefile viburnum: Viburnum plicatum tomentosum ‘Summer Snowflake’

Native Shrubs

I thought that I would post some pictures of the native shrubs in the garden. They are mostly in one area, along the neighbors fence down from the swamp (actually the red huckleberry and the salmonberry are in what I term the swamp)

No berries from the native red elderberry (Sambucus racemosa) yet.

red elderberry - Sambucus racemosa

red elderberry – Sambucus racemosa

The Pacific ninebark (Physocarpus capitatus) will very likely get huge… but can always be pruned.

Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus

Pacific ninebark – Physocarpus capitatus

This salal (Gaultheria shallon) has been in the garden for years.

salal: Gaultheria shallon

salal: Gaultheria shallon

I don’t remember whether or not the native red twig dogwood (Cornus sericea) produced berries last year – and whether or not the birds ate them.

red twig dogwood: Cornus sericea

red twig dogwood: Cornus sericea

The Nootka rose (Rosa nutkana) did not bloom last year.

Nootka rose: Rosa nutkana

Nootka rose: Rosa nutkana

There are two small Oregon grapes (Mahonia aquifolium), and I am not sure if they are ‘Compacta’ or ‘John Muir’ – two different tags were on them (I think nursery and grower).

Oregon Grape

Oregon Grape: Mahonia aquifolium ‘Compacta’ or ‘John Muir’

The native red flowering currant (Ribes sanguineum) (as opposed to the cultivar of the native, ‘King Edward VII,’ which we also have) bloomed this year, but sadly the hummingbirds were not around. They were in Washington, but just not in the yard.

red flowering currant: Ribes sanguineum

red flowering currant: Ribes sanguineum

I liked the idea of a native western hazelnut (Corylus cornuta), but this will get quite large. There is also a European hazelnut/filbert (Corylus avellana ‘Butler’ – the species they use for commercial hazelnuts) in the yard and also a Harry Lauder’s walking stick (Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’). Hopefully that is enough for something to get pollinated, so we can have some hazelnuts for the birds/squirrels!

western hazelnut: Corylus cornuta

western hazelnut: Corylus cornuta

The red huckleberry (Vaccinium parvifolium) did not fruit last year. I am probably sending the birds mixed messages by growing berry plants for them, and also blueberry plants for me (also Vaccinium). I think I may put bird netting on the four blueberry plants.

red huckleberry: Vaccinium parvifolium

red huckleberry: Vaccinium parvifolium

The salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis) also did not fruit last year, and I think I’m sending more mixed messages, because raspberries are also in the genus Rubus.

salmonberry: Rubus spectabilis

salmonberry: Rubus spectabilis

I couldn’t get a good picture of either of the two native flowering dogwoods (Cornus nuttallii ‘Goldspot’). Because they are cultivars (‘Goldspot’), they are supposed to stay smaller and have variegated leaves. The leaves don’t look very variegated this year, so I hope they are not reverting. Maybe the gold will pop up later?

western flowering dogwood - Cornus nuttallii 'Goldspot'

western flowering dogwood – Cornus nuttallii ‘Goldspot’

Putting Out the Crown Bees

The BeeAdventure Kit and the bees that I purchased during this entry finally went up/out. I was waiting for the apple tree to be ready… and after that, I was waiting for the rain to stop.

bee cocoons

bee cocoons

bee cocoons

bee cocoons

BeeAdventure Kit

BeeAdventure Kit

BeeAdventure Kit

BeeAdventure Kit

We put the little bee house on the neighbor’s fence. Do I think that the thing will last the rainy winter? Not especially. But, by next year I should have some idea of if I am into the Crown Bees method or not. If I enjoy harvesting the cocoons and storing them in the refrigerator over the winter and etc., I may choose next year to buy a Crown Bees bee house that is made out of real wood (I don’t know what this material is). The Crown Bees way theoretically maximizes one’s amount of bees, but the co-gardener thinks it seems needlessly unnatural – providing wooden houses should be enough. However, the co-gardener did not attend the bee talk, and I somewhat sipped the Kool-Aid.

As you can see, the apple tree is quite ready.

2013 Miscell 1214 apple tree 2013 Miscell 1215 apple tree 2013 Miscell 1216 apple tree 2013 Miscell 1217 apple tree

 

Updated Conifer Garden

Thursday April 11 the co-gardener and I updated the conifer garden. For information about the new conifers, see the new conifer post  and also the conifer planting post

Previous conifer garden post with pictures

Here are some pictures:

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Blizzard' and Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Ellwood's Pygmy'

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Blizzard’ and Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Ellwood’s Pygmy’

Port Orford cedar - Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Silver Queen'

Port Orford cedar – Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Silver Queen’

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Spiralis' and Cryptomeria japonica 'Pygmaea'

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Spiralis’ and Cryptomeria japonica ‘Pygmaea’

Juniperus squamata 'Floriant'

Juniperus squamata ‘Floriant’

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Blizzard'

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Blizzard’

updated conifer garden

updated conifer garden

updated conifer garden

updated conifer garden

Cryptomeria japonica 'Tenzan'

Cryptomeria japonica ‘Tenzan’

updated conifer garden

updated conifer garden

Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Ellwood's Pygmy'

Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Ellwood’s Pygmy’

Planting Conifers, Weeding, Dead-Heading Hydrangeas, Cutting Astilbes, Juncuses, and the Bluebeard

In the past week, the co-gardener and I have done a variety of work in the garden. You may have noticed by now that we are buying faster than we are planting, so getting things in the ground is a priority. Also, I am working at weeding the whole garden, and it is going slowly. Some areas have not been weeded yet this year, and until they are, will not be appearing on this site. Weeding is a boring subject and will probably never include photos. Otherwise, I will give some details, although possibly not in order.

The co-gardener got the four delphiniums in. They are delicate things, and the leaves were getting broken and etc. from the plants falling over in the wind. Well, and interesting thing: we bought some catnip and then, in a hurry, I forgot to put it up. So I looked out the window and saw our cat seemingly chewing on the delphiniums. I couldn’t make sense of it, until I remembered, “the catnip!” I went down there, put the plants up, and offered our cat a piece. Jay doesn’t usually care about catnip – we plant it in a hanging basket in memory of a departed cat, Rufus – so I was surprised that Jay was interested in it. He ate the piece, and then started chewing on a delphinium. I am not sure if the delphinium smelled like catnip from formerly being next to it, or if it just looked similar enough. I thought “ack! the delicate delphiniums!” and brought down a catnip plant and let Jay enjoy that for a few moments (and then he lost interest). Anyhow, the co-gardener planted them in the rose garden but I am not including any pictures because I have not weeded that area yet. Upon seeing little evidence of any emergence of last year’s delphiniums, the co-gardener got disgusted and said that if they were going to be that way, no more delphiniums would be purchased. I think that there is still time for them to pop up. Besides that, I did see one growing. I pointed that out, and the co-gardener just repeated the disgusted statement. I think maybe four were in the ground from last year – I’d have to do some thinking to know the number for sure.

The co-gardener finally dead-headed the hydrangea heads/blossoms/puffs. No one had gotten around to it. The back part is still not done – it is difficult to reach. Dead-heading is kind of calming, but I was trying to put a priority on the weeds.

dead-heading hydrangeas: partway through

dead-heading hydrangeas: partway through

pile of hydrangea puffs

pile of hydrangea puffs

pile of hydrangea puffs

pile of hydrangea puffs

I realized that the astilbes had new growth, so it was time to cut out last year’s brown stuff. I tend to leave it there for awhile in order to know where the plants are. There are five astilbes in the swamp.

astilbes before pruning

astilbes before pruning

Astilbe x arendsii 'Hyacinth' before pruning

Astilbe x arendsii ‘Hyacinth’ before pruning

Astilbe x arendsii 'Astary Pink' before pruning

Astilbe x arendsii ‘Astary Pink’ before pruning

While in the swamp with the astilbes, I cut at a few juncuses. I read somewhere that this is ok: that dead pieces just happen. We will see if they get perked up.

an example of a brown juncus: Juncus effusus 'Unicorn'

an example of a brown juncus: Juncus effusus ‘Unicorn’

The co-gardener decided to prune the bluebeard (Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Korball’  Blue Balloon). I said to look it up online, and the co-gardener replied “you know, pruning is my specialty.” Sigh.

pre-pruning Blue Balloon Bluebeard - Caryopteris x clandonensis 'Korball' Blue Balloon

pre-pruning Blue Balloon Bluebeard – Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Korball’ Blue Balloon

The co-gardener and I did some planting in the conifer garden. I will include pictures of the end result in a separate post. First of all, the conifer garden had to be expanded. This involved moving:

Tasmanian mountain pepper - Drimys lanceolata new location

Tasmanian mountain pepper – Drimys lanceolata new location

The plant was not moved very far. It is still along the fence, but no longer next to the purple osmanthus.

mountain pepper - Drimys lanceolata and purple-leaf osmanthus - Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Purpureus'

mountain pepper – Drimys lanceolata and purple-leaf osmanthus – Osmanthus heterophyllus ‘Purpureus’

I will make the next post about the updated conifer garden. See the last post for additional information about some of the conifers. Unfortunately, I do not think that there is any space for a fir (abies) or an arborvitae (genus including western red cedar, thuja). It would be spiffy to have every kind of conifer in the conifer garden, but it probably won’t happen. Too many cryptomerias, chamaecyparis, and blue spruces.

Northwest Hardware Store Purchases

Wednesday April 10 the co-gardener and I visited a hardware store that is part of a small Northwest chain. It has a larger garden section than the box hardware stores. We went mostly because we had not been there since last year. We ended up with some purchases – the most exciting of which are the conifers. Additional conifer pictures will be in a specific conifer garden post.

new conifers

new conifers

Port Orford cedar - Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Silver Queen'

Port Orford cedar – Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Silver Queen’

Cryptomeria japonica 'Pygmaea' and Chamaecyparis lawsonia 'Ellwood's Pygmy'

Cryptomeria japonica ‘Pygmaea’ and Chamaecyparis lawsonia ‘Ellwood’s Pygmy’

catnip

catnip

box of herbs

box of herbs

Delphinium 'Astrolat' and coneflower -Echinacea purpurea 'Pink Double Delight' and Delphinium davidii

Delphinium ‘Astrolat’ and coneflower – Echinacea purpurea ‘Pink Double Delight’ and Delphinium davidii

Campanula glomerata 'Emerald' and Phlox paniculata 'Peppermint Twist'

Campanula glomerata ‘Emerald’ and Phlox paniculata ‘Peppermint Twist’

Juniper - Juniperus squamata 'Floriant'

Juniper – Juniperus squamata ‘Floriant’

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Blizzard'

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Blizzard’

Catchfly - Silene dioica 'Clifford Moor'

Catchfly – Silene dioica ‘Clifford Moor’

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Spiralis'

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Spiralis’

Cryptomeria japonica 'Tenzan'

Cryptomeria japonica ‘Tenzan’

  • The biggest purchase was the Port Orford cedar, also called Lawson cypress . They are not actually cedars or cypresses, but instead Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (same genus as hinoki cypresses), and this one is ‘Silver Queen.’ The species of these trees, which grow in southwestern Oregon and northwestern California, is in a bad way. In the wild, they are threatened by a fungal disease. Monrovia, the grower of this plant, states that this tree “is grown on a root stock that is resistant to Phytophthora lateralis – a disease that has caused the demise of many Chamaecyparis lawsonianas over the last two decades.” ‘Silver Queen’ is part of “the Guardian Series.” The co-gardener had been looking at these trees for quite awhile, and upon finding a good price and ready availability, gave in and bought it.
  • Lawson false cypress – Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Ellwood’s Pygmy’ – I thought this thing was adorable, and the tag says that it grows to three feet tall and only fifteen inches wide, so I figured that it would fit in the conifer garden fine. After it came home and I thought about it awhile – it is the same species as the Port Orford Cedar (‘Silver Queen’), but there is no indication of it being grafted on resistant root stock. So, maybe it will croak. I had a hard time finding information on it.
  • Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Spiralis’ (hinoki cypress, but not really a cypress) – there are tons of varieties of Chamaecyparis out there, and most of them seem quite great. Unfortunately, I have difficulty knowing how to pronounce the genus name, so might be saying it totally wrong. I heard Ciscoe Morris say it at the garden show, but it was too brief for me to commit it to memory. This particular plant is rather small, although it grows to 3-5 feet. I thought it was especially adorable and am seriously considering putting it in a pot. I just like touching it, flopping it back and forth.
  • Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Blizzard’ – this variegated plant is pretty impressive. I had quite a bit of difficulty finding real information on it, so it can’t be especially common. It is somewhat of a poofball, with yellow mixed in with the green.
  • Cryptomeria japonica ‘Pygmaea’ – the cryptomeria genus only includes one species – C. japonica – and they plants are sometimes called Japanese cedars. They come in some interesting shapes, and the conifer garden already includes a few. This one is twisty and remains quite small (the tag indicates that it is nearly full-grown). I intend to put it in a pot. Another plant about which I had a hard time finding information.
  • Cryptomeria japonica ‘Tenzan’ – I had difficulty finding online information about this little dome. I guess that this particular hardware store stocks unusual (or somewhat unusual) conifers. The plant is a thick little dome that only gets two feet by two feet.
  • Juniperus squamata ‘Floriant’ – the co-gardener and I have mixed feelings about junipers, for some are quite ugly and/or over-used, but this variegated one was too adorable. It gets two feet tall and four feet wide.
  • Catnip – Nepeta cataria x2 – for a pot
  • Phlox paniculata ‘Peppermint Twist’ – the garden does not really need another phlox, but this one is pinwheeled and especially nifty.
  • Campanula glomerata ‘Emerald’ (bellflower) – this is quite pretty, and probably will go in the woodland garden
  • Delphinium davidii – delphiniums are sometimes called larkspurs, but larkspur can also refer to annuals. This one has somewhat variegated leaves. The co-gardener puts the delphiniums in the rose garden.
  • Delphinium ‘Astolat’ (Pacific Giant series) – also a pretty delphinium.
  • Echinacea purpurea ‘Pink Double Delight’ (coneflower) – for some reason, echinaceas are expensive – I can’t figure it out. ‘Pink Double Delight’ is a well-known variety, and has a nice tufty middle – and shockingly, it was inexpensive.
  • Catchfly – Silene dioica ‘Clifford Moor’ – I had never heard of a catchfly before. I recognized this as being in the same genus as sea campion, but my familiarity ends there. This plant is variegated, and variegation always interests the co-gardener.
  • Variegated oreganum – the co-gardener picked up a few herbs. Some of them had variety information, and some did not.
  • Curry
  • Golden variegated sage – Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’
  • Prostrate rosemary – no specific variety
  • Foxley thyme – Thymus pulegioides ‘Foxley’
  • Lemon thyme – Thymus x citriodorus
  • Silver posie thyme – Thymus vulgaris ‘Silver Posie’