Category Archives: Woodland

Spring Clematises

We currently have four clematises: three are in the ground and one I’ll be planting tomorrow (if the weather cooperates). The evergreen clematis blooms very early–I think March–and I did not take any pictures of it this year because it is a little unhealthy (the landscapers put a heap of gravel on its roots, and it hasn’t been the same since).

We have two clematises that bloom in late spring (and I think are blooming right now, but they could be finished). The clematis in the woodland garden is old, and I am not sure what its name is. I’m surprised that I do not have more pictures of these clematises.

Woodland garden clematis:

woodland clematis woodland clematis

Clematis ‘Warsaw Nike’:

Clematis 'Warsaw Nike'

The woodland garden clematis is the one that shares its trellis with the akebia.

Akebia

We have a fiveleaf akebia (Akebia quinata) in the woodland garden. These pictures of it blooming are from late April (I’m not sure how long it bloomed–a lot of stuff was going on then, and I didn’t even notice that the vine was blooming until the co-gardener pointed it out). The akebia shares a trellis with a clematis that is entirely covering the area now (I will post pictures of the clematis separately). I think the akebia has a scent, but I can’t remember much about it right now, so obviously I did not sniff it this year.

fiveleaf akebia - Akebia quinata fiveleaf akebia - Akebia quinata fiveleaf akebia - Akebia quinata

Deciduous Azaleas (thus far)

Many deciduous azaleas are sweetly scented. Some of them bloomed in May, some will bloom later (or at least they did last year), and perhaps some are not planning on blooming this year. We have an “azalea garden” in the front with deciduous azaleas, and we also have a ‘Cannon’s Double’ azalea on the side of the house (in the woodland garden) and a ‘Cannon’s Double’ in the backyard (which was purchased because the one on the side of the house stopped being double).

The azalea garden in March, after I’d weeded it–it looks rather barren before the foliage starts:

azalea garden azalea garden

The azalea garden during blooming:

azalea garden azalea garden

The contorted filbert/hazelnut (Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’ or “Harry Lauder’s walking stick”) in the middle of the azalea garden is dying, I think. I’m not too happy about it. I know that sometimes hazelnuts get a disease, but I really liked it and was really pleased with it when I planted it. Trees aren’t cheap, either. The plant doesn’t have very many leaves this year, and it has these weird canker things on it. I don’t know if I would replace it–I might worry about the next one getting sick, too. They do make red ones, which I didn’t know about when we got this one–but I just don’t know that I would want to take a chance again. The contorted hazelnut went in long before the azaleas were purchased, so it’s quite likely that the azalea garden does not actually need a contorted filbert in the middle of it–that the azaleas fill it just fine. Sigh. I don’t generally talk about the plants that don’t make it, but this one is right in the middle of the picture, and also I feel somewhat irritated about the whole situation. The fact that it took less than two years for it to start dying makes me think that it was never that healthy in the first place–that it probably came from the nursery diseased.

Anyhow, on to happy thoughts.

Azalea ‘Candy Lights’:

Azalea 'Candy Lights'

Azalea ‘Girard’s Red Pom Pom’:

Azalea 'Girard's Red Pom Pom' Azalea 'Girard's Red Pom Pom' Azalea 'Girard's Red Pom Pom'

Azalea ‘Rosy Lights’:

Azalea 'Rosy Lights' Azalea 'Rosy Lights' Azalea 'Rosy Lights' Azalea 'Rosy Lights' Azalea 'Rosy Lights'

Honeysuckle azalea–Rhododendron luteum:

honeysuckle azalea - Rhododendron luteum honeysuckle azalea - Rhododendron luteum

Unknown deciduous azalea:

unknown deciduous azalea unknown deciduous azalea

Azalea ‘Snowbird’:

Azalea 'Snowbird' Azalea 'Snowbird'

Azalea ‘Cannon’s Double’ in woodland garden:

Azalea 'Cannon's Double' in woodland garden Azalea 'Cannon's Double' in woodland garden Azalea 'Cannon's Double' in woodland garden

Azalea ‘Cannon’s Double’ in backyard:

Azalea 'Cannon's Double' in backyard Azalea 'Cannon's Double' in backyard

Red Flowering Currants

We have two red flowering currants: one is a cultivar, and the other is the regular native species. The cultivar definitely blooms more profusely (and earlier). The cultivar is in the woodland garden, which has pretty nice soil, while the regular species is in the swamp: that could make a different, I guess. These pictures were mostly taken in March, with a few taken in early April.

Ribes sanguineum ‘King Edward VII’:

flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII' flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum 'King Edward VII'

Ribes sanguineum:

red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum red flowering currant - Ribes sanguineum

Hellebores

Hellebores are reliable late-winter bloomers.

For each plant, there are about a couple photos from February 13 and about a couple from March 6.

Helleborus x ballardiae ‘Pink Frost’:

Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost' Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost' 2014 Miscell 0234 Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost' Helleborus x ballardiae 'Pink Frost'

Helleborus ‘Onyx Odyssey’:

Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey' Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey' Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey' Helleborus 'Onyx Odyssey'

Helleborus orientalis ‘Frilly Kitten’:

Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten' Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten' Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten' Helleborus orientalis 'Frilly Kitten'

Helleborus x hybridus ‘Royal Heritage Strain’:

Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain' Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain' Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain' Helleborus x hybridus 'Royal Heritage Strain'

Helleborus ‘Peppermint Ice’:

Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice' Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice' Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice' Helleborus 'Peppermint Ice'

Helleborus argutifolius ‘Snow Fever’:

Helleborus argutifolius 'Snow Fever' Helleborus argutifolius 'Snow Fever' Helleborus argutifolius 'Snow Fever'

Helleborus ‘Cherry Blossom’:

Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom' Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom' Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom' Helleborus 'Cherry Blossom'

Helleborus orientalis ‘Elly’:

Helleborus orientalis 'Elly' Helleborus orientalis 'Elly' Helleborus orientalis 'Elly' Helleborus orientalis 'Elly'

Liatris, Thalictrum, Sea Holly

Some perennials:

I do not have a strong feeling about the liatris (Liatris spicata ‘Kobold’) – it is more the co-gardener’s plant. Liatris are apparently sometimes called gay-feathers or blazing-stars, but I’ve always called them liatris. I planted this plant last year, after determining that the liatris bulbs, which I wasted much time on, were not going to come up.

Liatris spicata 'Kobold'

Liatris spicata ‘Kobold’

Liatris spicata 'Kobold'

Liatris spicata ‘Kobold’

The thalictrum (Thalictrum rochebrunianum ‘Lavender Mist’) is extremely tall. It is planted in the woodland garden, and is about the only thing going on in that area right now.

Thalictrum rochebrunianum 'Lavender Mist': meadow rue

Thalictrum rochebrunianum ‘Lavender Mist’: meadow rue

Thalictrum rochebrunianum 'Lavender Mist': meadow rue

Thalictrum rochebrunianum ‘Lavender Mist’: meadow rue

Thalictrum rochebrunianum 'Lavender Mist': meadow rue

Thalictrum rochebrunianum ‘Lavender Mist’: meadow rue

We bought a sea holly at the garden show in 2012 in a Ziploc bag (I just talked about the Ziploc bags in the last post). It is in the front yard and has never bloomed. This year, the co-gardener bought a new sea holly, which was obviously going to bloom. It’s a short, cute little thing.

sea holly: Eryngium planum 'Blue Hobbit'

sea holly: Eryngium planum ‘Blue Hobbit’

Two Hardy Geraniums

There are four hardy geraniums in the garden, and two have already shown up in a previous post (Geranium macrorrhizum ‘Variegatum’). Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and Geranium pratense ‘Midnight Reiter’ are both in the woodland garden.

Hardy geraniums are true geraniums – the ones sold as annuals, including zonal geraniums and scented geraniums, are actually of the genus Pelargonium. Supposedly hardy geraniums are called “cranesbills” but I am not so sure about that. Cranesbills?

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ is quite sprawling. It is doing a good job as a groundcover and has been blooming for awhile (long-blooming is great). Last year the co-gardener thought it was buttercup and pulled some of it out, but you can’t tell that it happened. Because of an arbor we bought and need to put up, Geranium ‘Rozanne’ will probably have to move. I can’t guess where to put it since it is so sprawling.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’:

2013 Miscell 2475 Geranium 'Rozanne' 2013 Miscell 2302 Geranium 'Rozanne' 2013 Miscell 2127 Geranium 'Rozanne' 2013 Miscell 2743 Geranium 'Rozanne'

Geranium pratense ‘Midnight Reiter’ has great dark foliage, but didn’t bloom very long. I dead-headed it and will see if it blooms again…. it doesn’t especially look like it wants to. I think I bought both Geranium ‘Rozanne’ and Geranium pratense ‘Midnight Reiter’ the same day, wanting some later blooming things for the woodland garden (many in the area are early blooming, like hellebores, columbines, bleeding hearts, and the tiarella). I still want more later blooming items in the woodland garden, but am basically out of space. I have to think about it.

Geranium pratense ‘Midnight Reiter’:

2013 Miscell 2284 Geranium pratense 'Midnight Reiter' 2013 Miscell 2120 Geranium pratense 'Midnight Reiter'

UPDATE: we arranged the arbor last night, and the co-gardener thinks that ‘Rozanne’ can remain where it is.

White Calla Lilies, Japanese Irises, Tattling Fern

These pictures are not recent. In fact, the white calla lilies (Zantedeschia aethiopica) and the Japanese irises (Iris ensata) have stopped blooming. There are six tall white calla lilies and we planted two Japanese irises (they may have spread), and all are located in the swamp.

I took these pictures of the tattling fern (Athyrium filix-femina ‘Frizelliae’) before some perennials filled in, so now one cannot see it. It is on my agenda to move it somewhere else – it just doesn’t show. Right now it is in the woodland garden, but it might end up elsewhere.

I don’t know how I feel about Japanese irises: they seem a bit floppy. Like the blossoms flop. On the other hand, they seem to be doing better than the Siberian irises (what happened to those? I preferred them).

White calla lilies (Zantedeschia aethiopica):

2013 Miscell 1724 calla lily - Zantedeschia aethiopica 2013 Miscell 1723 calla lily - Zantedeschia aethiopica

Japanese irises (Iris ensata):

2013 Miscell 1939 Japanese iris - Iris ensata 2013 Miscell 1938 Japanese iris - Iris ensata 2013 Miscell 1996 Japanese irises - Iris ensata

Tattling fern (Athyrium filix-femina ‘Frizelliae’):

2013 Miscell 1503 tattling fern - Athyrium filix-femina ‘Frizelliae’ 2013 Miscell 1502 tattling fern - Athyrium filix-femina ‘Frizelliae’ 2013 Miscell 1501 tattling fern - Athyrium filix-femina ‘Frizelliae’ 2013 Miscell 1500 tattling fern - Athyrium filix-femina ‘Frizelliae’

‘Blue Bird’ Delphinium, Native Bleeding Heart, Heuchera ‘Lime Marmalade,’ Hardy Gloxinia

As I think I mentioned before, some of the delphiniums from last year didn’t come back, and some of the new delphiniums are yet to bloom. The co-gardener pretty much said “not again.” I don’t know why they are so testy… maybe they just don’t like being in the rose garden (unfortunately, thanks to the neighbor’s trees, the rose garden is part shade – not good for roses). ‘Blue Bird’ looks nice, though.

Delphinium 'Blue Bird'

Delphinium ‘Blue Bird’

Delphinium 'Blue Bird'

Delphinium ‘Blue Bird’

This is done blooming, but I had meant to include it. I already posted some pictures of the volunteer native bleeding hearts, but this one is in the woodland garden and was planted there.

Pacific bleeding heart - Dicentra formosa

Pacific bleeding heart – Dicentra formosa

This heuchera is in the woodland garden (the other two from the woodland garden got moved out in a previous post). It seems to be doing fine there. Heucheras were originally referred to as “coral bells,” but a lot of them are no longer grown for their blooms, but instead for their evergreen foliage.

Heuchera 'Lime Marmalade'

Heuchera ‘Lime Marmalade’

The hardy gloxinia might be done – I’m not sure. It is seriously crowded in its spot and did not attain the height that it did last year (it was purchased blooming, which can lead to let-downs the next year).

hardy gloxinia: Incarvillea delavay 'Bees Pink'

hardy gloxinia: Incarvillea delavay ‘Bees Pink’

Two Clematis

This is a clematis growing along a deck post, ‘Warsaw Nike’:

2013 Miscell 1710 Clematis 'Warsaw Nike' 2013 Miscell 1709 Clematis 'Warsaw Nike'

This one is in the woodland garden – it is old and I don’t know its name:

2013 Miscell 1763 unknown clematis

There is a clematis that I intend to get next year. It is new and supposed to be scented with a longer (summer) blooming period. You will have to wait until I have it! I think it will be mail order.