By the way

Yes, I haven’t been posting much about perennials yet this year. I want to get caught up with shrubs first. I’m getting there!

Pink Princess Escallonias

We have four Pink Princess escallonias (Escallonia x exoniensis ‘Fradesii’) in the backyard. They are evergreen and are situated to block the area under the deck (the yard is on a slope). They have a light scent and are quite pretty. Probably by next year the escallonias will need some pruning.

I took these pictures two days ago.

Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii' Pink Princess escallonia - Escallonia x exoniensis 'Fradesii'

Spring Clematises

We currently have four clematises: three are in the ground and one I’ll be planting tomorrow (if the weather cooperates). The evergreen clematis blooms very early–I think March–and I did not take any pictures of it this year because it is a little unhealthy (the landscapers put a heap of gravel on its roots, and it hasn’t been the same since).

We have two clematises that bloom in late spring (and I think are blooming right now, but they could be finished). The clematis in the woodland garden is old, and I am not sure what its name is. I’m surprised that I do not have more pictures of these clematises.

Woodland garden clematis:

woodland clematis woodland clematis

Clematis ‘Warsaw Nike’:

Clematis 'Warsaw Nike'

The woodland garden clematis is the one that shares its trellis with the akebia.

Akebia

We have a fiveleaf akebia (Akebia quinata) in the woodland garden. These pictures of it blooming are from late April (I’m not sure how long it bloomed–a lot of stuff was going on then, and I didn’t even notice that the vine was blooming until the co-gardener pointed it out). The akebia shares a trellis with a clematis that is entirely covering the area now (I will post pictures of the clematis separately). I think the akebia has a scent, but I can’t remember much about it right now, so obviously I did not sniff it this year.

fiveleaf akebia - Akebia quinata fiveleaf akebia - Akebia quinata fiveleaf akebia - Akebia quinata

Warty Barberries and Crucifixion Thorns

We have two evergreen warty barberries (Berberis verruculosa) in the front yard next to three crucifixion thorns (Colletia hystrix–also called “anchor plants”). I’m putting both types of plants in the same post because they are close together and thus share photographs. We bought the five pokey plants to keep the neighbors’ dog out of our yard, but then the neighbor went and built a chicken coop fence (I guess he got the hint). We’re not too found of the chicken coop fence, but the plants are growing to cover it nicely.

The warty barberries bloomed at the end of April. I think the crucifixion thorns have bloomed in the past, but I don’t remember off of the top of my head when they bloom, and I am not sure if they did bloom this year.

Warty barberries: Berberis verruculosa:

warty barberry - Berberis verruculosa warty barberry - Berberis verruculosa warty barberry - Berberis verruculosa warty barberry - Berberis verruculosa2014 Miscell 1278 warty barberry

Crucifixion thorns: Colletia hystrix:

crucifixion thorn - anchor plant - Colletia hystrix crucifixion thorn - anchor plant - Colletia hystrix

Both types:

crucifixion thorn - anchor plant - Colletia hystrix and warty barberry - Berberis verruculosa crucifixion thorn - anchor plant - Colletia hystrix and warty barberry - Berberis verruculosa crucifixion thorn - anchor plant - Colletia hystrix and warty barberry - Berberis verruculosa

Did we need all five pokey plants? Probably not. Also, when I (very enthusiastically) picked out these plants, I didn’t think about what it would be like weeding around them.

Variegated Viburnums

We have two variegated viburnums in the yard. One of the viburnums, Viburnum japonicum ‘Variegatum’, bloomed at the same time as the doublefile viburnums (early- to mid-May), but the other variegated viburnum, Viburnum tinus ‘Variegatum’, didn’t bloom–but I’m including pictures of it anyhow.

Viburnum japonicum ‘Variegatum’:

Viburnum japonicum 'Variegatum' Viburnum japonicum 'Variegatum'

Viburnum tinus ‘Variegatum’:

Viburnum tinus 'Variegatum' Viburnum tinus 'Variegatum'

Himalayan Leptodermis

This year, a lot of plants get posted after they are done blooming (for several reasons), but the Himalayan leptodermis (Leptodermis oblonga) is blooming right now! I took these pictures a few days ago. It is in a section of dwarf shrubs in the front yard (and it is actually staying dwarf, unlike some of the plants). I think that this plant is rather sweet. However, I tend to always forget its name–I can remember that “Himalayan” is in the name, but I forget the rest. Oh well, I could probably try harder to remember.

Himalayan leptodermis - Leptodermis oblonga Himalayan leptodermis - Leptodermis oblonga Himalayan leptodermis - Leptodermis oblonga Himalayan leptodermis - Leptodermis oblonga Himalayan leptodermis - Leptodermis oblonga

Ninebarks

We have two ninebarks in the yard: a showy dark-colored plant and also the native ninebark. They are both growing quite quickly. The pictures of the plants blooming are from late May to early June.

Diabolo ninebark: Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Monlo’:

Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo' Diabolo ninebark - Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo'

Pacific ninebark: Physocarpus capitatus (native):

Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus Pacific ninebark - Physocarpus capitatus

Mountain Laurel

We have one mountain laurel in the yard, Kalmia latifolia ‘Raspberry Glow’. Mountain laurels are related to rhododendrons. Ours is located in the shrubrow. These pictures were taken from late May to mid-June.

mountain laurel - Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow' mountain laurel - Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow' mountain laurel - Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow' mountain laurel - Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow' mountain laurel - Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow' mountain laurel - Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow' mountain laurel - Kalmia latifolia 'Raspberry Glow'

Carolina Allspice

I didn’t notice the Carolina allspice (Calycanthus floridus) blooming until I think it had already been at it awhile. It is located in the shrubrow, and I have to remind myself to go over there sometimes. We bought this plant when it was not in bloom; then, I got home and read that one should always buy this type of plant in bloom because the scent varies. We have had it two years and I have still not made up my mind about it–the scent is really different.

This picture was taken in late May.

Carolina allspice - Calycanthus floridus